Church and Community 4: Anthropology

The tricky business of being human!…In part 4 here Ruth Valerio continues her series of reflections from the recent conference at Redcliffe College, which looked at sustainable communities and the engagement of the church. Andy

Ruth Valerio

weca canal ‘The Human Propensity to F**k Things Up’ (otherwise known as THPTFTU) is Francis Spufford’s memorable definition of what sin is. I think it’s a great description. I know it applies to me.

Another way of looking at it is the platitude beloved of preaching about church: ‘if you think you’ve found the perfect church, don’t join it.’

One of the foundations of the Christian faith is a pretty robust assessment of human beings, both positively and negatively.

We can be the most amazing of creatures, able to reach beyond ourselves and carry out wonderful acts of bravery, generosity and sacrifice. We all know ‘big’ stories of that. One of my favourite ‘little’ stories though happened in one of the roads on our estate – actually the road historically considered to be one of the worst in Chichester and a dumping ground for people who are evicted from elsewhere.

One of…

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